Ibogaine is a psychedelic drug. A better description of the effects of ibogaine would be oneirophrenic, or “dream creating”. To a bystander it would appear that a person on ibogaine was simply lying down in a state of partial sleep while having dreams.

Some patients report their experience as if they were watching a movie of their life or they were able to reorganize the file cabinets in their brains. Every person’s experience is as unique as the individual themself; however, any insights into the subconscious and superconscious mind may become a valuable foundation for a future without drugs. During the weeks after ibogaine treatment people find that they can sort through issues that may have burdened them; change compulsive behaviors; and become receptive to therapy. Not everyone who ingests ibogaine has a vivid visual experience; in fact only about 75% of patients experience visuals. Some people sleep throughout the duration of the drug’s effects, and others experience only series of rapid thoughts or flashing lights. The anti-addictive and withdrawal diminishing properties of ibogaine still work on these patients, nonetheless. As with other psychodelics, ibogaine itself is non-addictive.

Side effects from ibogaine use may include: visual distortion, visual and auditory hallucinations, ataxia (temporary loss of the ability to coordinate muscular movement), nausea, and mild tremor. All of these effects are transitory, and wear off completely after 48 hours.